Different Forms of Violence Against Children and Youth

Different Forms of Violence Against Children and Youth

Both Central America and the Caribbean are known for the high levels of violence against children and youth (Selee et al., 2013; Shifter, 2012; UNICEF, 2006). Across all identified populations, we will measure political, institutional, economic, and social forms of violence as varying life course experiences among children and youth (Mosher and Mcilwaine, 2006). This team will concentrate on collecting primary data for quantifying the prevalence of violence.

Data will be collected using a modified versions of the MICS (Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey) and the “National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence,” which measures violence experienced in conventional crime, maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual victimization, witnessing and other exposure to violence (Finkelhor et al., 2005). Another important data collection instrument will be the “Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire,” which has been extensively used internationally.

There is a Spanish version that has already been validated for the United States and Spain, making validation for participating countries relatively simple; it is presently being validated in the Dominican (Hamby et al., 2011; Parada, 2013). We will also explore the possibility of replicating the Canadian Incidence Study, which collects data on different forms of violence (Trocmé et al., 2010). Youth will be consulted in focus groups and community meetings. Additional data on the resiliency of children and youth who face different forms of violence will also be collected (Liebenerberg & Ungar, 2009).